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10 Cool Amazing Facts You Didnt Know About Android

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Android, the worlds mostly widely used smartphone operating System is growing day by day with its highly enriched user interface and extensively used mobile applications.  Some are using it as platform to develop applications while the others use it as one of source which connects them with their friends and relatives due to its highly customizable and user friendly applications.Android Facts

Google has constantly updated the Android OS to bring about some great changes in the user experience. However, some of these changes are so subtle that they slip under your radar. Whether they are minor changes to existing features, new introductions to your device or even cool older tricks, you can’t keep track of them all!

Android has been around for nearly a decade already and a lot has changed since the beginning. What started as just one simple phone has become a powerhouse on countless devices and form factors. The history of Android is a very interesting story. You might think you know everything there is to know about Android, but we’ve got 10 things you probably didn’t know. Check it out!

1. Android was not founded by Google

Nowadays Google and Android are synonymous with each other, but you may be surprised to find out that was not always the case. Android was founded in 2003 by Andy Rubin, Rich Miner, Nick Sears, and Chris White. The founders had strong ties to T-Mobile. Andy Rubin created the ultra-popular T-Mobile Sidekick, and Nick Sears was vice president at T-Mobile. So you can see why T-Mobile landed the first Android phone.

It wasn’t until 2005 that Google acquired Android Inc. Rubin, Miner, and White all stayed with Android through the acquisition. Together they developed what we now know as the Android OS. In fact Rubin’s nickname is where the name “Android” came from. Many people consider Android to be one of Google’s best acquisitions. 10 years after the acquisition Android has ballooned to control 85% of the smartphone OS market share.

2. Google launched Android in 2007

Google officially launched the operating system in November 2007. The operating system had initially been developed for cameras but Google saw a potential in the usage of the OS on smartphones and worked on a lot more features that you can see now. So Google saw it as potential opportunity to establish its impact on market by making it a platform for newer version of Smartphone.

3. Android 1.0 and 1.1 were not named after desserts

For a long time Google has been nicknaming new versions of Android with desserts. At the time of this article we are at Android 5.0 “Lollipop,’ and before that it was KitKat, Jelly Bean, Ice Cream Sandwich, and so on. Android fans are always trying to predict what the next name will be. Google even got in on the fun with this teaser video for Android 5.0.

What you may not know is the first couple versions of Android were not named after desserts. Android 1.0 was sometimes called “Alpha” or “Astro Boy.” Android 1.1 kind has a dessert name, but not in the order that we know today. It was known internally as “Petit Four,” which is a small French appetizer. Android 1.5 “Cupcake” was the first version to have an official dessert nickname.

The “A” and “B” dessert names for Android 1.0 and 1.1 will never be known. If we had to guess which names they would have used we would go with “Apple Pie” and “Banana Split.” What would you guess?

4. Android 3.0 is the only version to never run on phones

In 2015 we know that Android is built to run on many different types of devices. Android 5.0 can run on phones, tablets, watches, cars, and TVs. That hasn’t always been the case. In 2010 the world got tablet fever when Apple announced the original iPad. Android manufacturers wanted to cash in on the tablet frenzy, but Android was only made for phones at that time.

Samsung had some luck using Android 2.3 Gingerbread on the mid-sized Galaxy Tab 7.0, but if Android was going to compete with the 10-inch iPad it needed some major work. At CES 2011 the world got its first look at Android 3.0 Honeycomb on the Motorola XOOM. It had a completely redesigned interface made especially for tablets.

If there is an Android version that can be called a failure it would be Honeycomb. Every manufacturer on the face of the Earth was making Android tablets, but they were expensive and lacked apps. Google eventually scrapped Honeycomb and built future versions of Android to work on all screen sizes. One of the lasting features of Honeycomb is the virtual nav buttons we still use today.

5. Android has more than a billion users

Google’s Vice President for Android, Sundar Pichai, announced that the Android operating system has powered hundreds of millions of mobile devices in more than 190 countries around the world. It’s the largest installed base of any mobile platform and growing fast—every day another million user’s power up their Android devices for the first time and start looking for apps, games, and other digital content.

6. Android Version Names

Apart from Android 1.0 and 1.1, all other Android versions have been named after sweet treats or desserts. These codenames are chosen alphabetically, and have thus far all been dessert items. Some codenames are associated with more than one version number, while others are limited to only a specific one. The reason for this inconsistency is not currently known. The naming typically appears to correspond to changes in the developer API levels, but this is not always true (example: 3.0 and 3.1 are both “Honeycomb” but they have different API levels).  The names of different versions are :-

Cupcake:

  • Android 1.5

Donut:

  • Android 1.6

Eclair:

  • Android 2.0
  • Android 2.1

Froyo: (short for “frozen yogurt”)

  • Android 2.2

Gingerbread:

  • Android 2.3

Honeycomb:

  • Android 3.0
  • Android 3.1
  • Android 3.2

Ice Cream Sandwich:

  • Android 4.0

Jelly Bean:

  • Android 4.1
  • Android 4.2
  • Android 4.3

KitKat:

  • Android 4.4

Lolipop:

  • Android 5.0
  • Android 5.1

7. Android Naming Order

Android versions have been following an alphabetical order in their naming and upgrades but many users have failed to notice this.

  1. A for Astro (1.0)
  2. B for Bender (1.1)
  3. C for Cupcake (1.5)
  4. D for Donut (1.6)
  5. E for Eclair (2.0)
  6. F for Froyo (2.2.x)
  7. G for Gingerbread (2.3.x)
  8. H for Honeycomb (3.x)
  9. I for Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0.x)
  10. J for Jelly Bean (4.3)
  11. K for KitKat (4.4)
  12. L for Lollipop (5.0)

8. Sony made the first Android smartwatch in 2010

In 2014 Google announced Android Wear, a special version of Android for smartwatches. Since then we’ve seen a bunch of Android smartwatches flood the market. You might think that these are the first Android smartwatches to be made, but one company beat everyone to the punch.

Way back in 2010 Sony (Ericsson) launched the LiveView watch. It connected to Android phones to display Twitter feeds, RSS feeds, SMS, and control the phone’s media player. In 2013 Sony launched the SmartWatch 2 with many of the same features. It wasn’t until this time that Samsung launched their first Android smartwatch. Sony had everyone beat.

9. Android is open source

Google offers Android operating system to smartphone manufacturers without payment for its license. This is one of the major advantages of Android which had attracted users as a platform to innovate more new apps based on it.

10. Google gains from Android

Despite offering the Android software open sourced to smartphone manufacturers, Google will likely achieve its aim of becoming the mobile advertising king through Android devices. Google makes its biggest revenue from advertising and this will pay off in the big way with the users from PCs to smartphones and tablets. It must be noted that Android dominates both categories.

Today we’re here to look at 25 amazing facts about this undeniably successful and impressive piece of software.

In 2004, the Android OS was developed with the backing of Google by Android Inc. In 2005, Google paid $50 million for the OS.

Originally the Android OS wasn’t designed for the smartphone market; it was actually developed as a digital camera platform.

All Android versions, with the exception of Android 1.0 & 1.1, are named after confectionary and desserts i.e. Jelly Bean, Ice Cream Sandwich and KitKat.

In November 2007, Google launched the Linux-based software system; Android OS.

The first smartphone running Android was released in 2008, the HTC Dream or T-Mobile G1 depending on your country, it had a sliding keyboard.

In California in 2003, Andy Rubin, Nick Sears and Chris White founded Android Inc.

Andy Rubin, Android’s Co-creator, was responsible for the name choice. Whilst at Apple, Andy was given the name for his love of robots.

NASA even uses Android. They sent 2 Nexus S handsets running Android Gingerbread into space to test their sensors in orbit aboard the International Space Station.

Android is available in around 46 languages, this also means apps can be produced in different languages to cover a wider audience.

Android’s app store “Google Play” has over 48 billion app installs.

Android has branched out to other devices like Google Glass and Watches.

At CES 2011 Android 3.0 Honeycomb was debuted on the Motorola XOOM. It was completely redesigned for tablets and never ran on smartphones. Honeycomb was a huge failure.

Android’s significance in the mobile market was perfectly realized in 2009 when Eric Schmidt, Google CEO, was forced to resign from Apple’s board of directors due to a conflict of interest and his inability to be involved in Apple’s developments and future plans.

In California in 2003, Andy Rubin, Nick Sears and Chris White founded Android Inc.

Andy Rubin, Android’s Co-creator, was responsible for the name choice. Whilst at Apple, Andy was given the name for his love of robots.

NASA even uses Android. They sent 2 Nexus S handsets running Android Gingerbread into space to test their sensors in orbit aboard the International Space Station.

Android is available in around 46 languages, this also means apps can be produced in different languages to cover a wider audience.

Android’s app store “Google Play” has over 48 billion app installs.

Android has branched out to other devices like Google Glass and Watches.

At CES 2011 Android 3.0 Honeycomb was debuted on the Motorola XOOM. It was completely redesigned for tablets and never ran on smartphones. Honeycomb was a huge failure.

Android’s significance in the mobile market was perfectly realized in 2009 when Eric Schmidt, Google CEO, was forced to resign from Apple’s board of directors due to a conflict of interest and his inability to be involved in Apple’s developments and future plans.

Irina Blok designed the logo in 2007, the general idea came from the man on toilet doors.

In 2015, Android’s OS was on 81.61% of all Smartphones sold.

In 2015 there were around 98.5 million Android smartphone users in the US and in 2016 there are 107.7 million.

There is an average of 42.38 million unique users a month who use the Android Facebook app.

As all Android users know, most apps are usually free but the average price seems to be just $0.06.

Android’s logo isn’t actually called Android, Google unofficially call him Bugdroid.

The Android system really is such an impressive piece of technology.

From its open-source nature to the simplicity of use, it ticks all the boxes when it comes to a mobile OS.

With tens of millions of people using it, they can’t be doing too badly for themselves over at Google!

Of course if you are an Apple fan that is completely understandable, just look at their user base they must be doing something right as well!

Marvel
Marvel covers daily news and rumours at Simmyideas Tech Hub

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